via AS

The sea – undoubtedly – hides too many secrets, especially in regard to the life that lives under it. But sometimes, amazing things also happen above the surface.

That was the case of a group of divers who were heading to the Gulf of California area, specifically to Cabo Pulmo, a special place for diving activity.

What surprised them was not what they found under the sea, but right on the border between the two worlds, a chase of a group of killer whales trying to hunt some dolphins.

The event lasted several hours and kept them entertained in the chase, but above all one particular image stood out. One of the killer whales made a high-speed charge from several meters underwater to attack a bottlenose dolphin.

Suddenly, the whale appears almost as if it was flying more than 150 inches above the surface, hitting the mammal and returning to the water. The shouts of surprise among those present perfectly portray the spectacular nature of the scene.

 

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Una publicación compartida de Miguel Cuevas (@miguel.cuevas19)

 

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In another image recorded by the divers, you can see the chase, which did not end well for the whales, who barely managed to get a single dolphin for 10 of them.

In any case, and as violent it may seem to us, experts understand the scene as normal. In fact, they are even looking for more images of the hunt to try and learn more about this species, understand its hunting processes and even mating processes after a hunt, especially if there was a male in the group.

Alisa Schulman Janiger, the co-founder of the California Killer Whale Project, called it “a fantastic encounter with very rarely seen whales this time of the year most of the time they are here during winter rather than summer.”

Killer whales mainly feed on marine mammals and rays, species that are abundant in the Gulf of California. At times, too, they are curious about the ships and sail alongside them, also leaving impressive images for those who travel aboard the vessels.