via Paga Hills Estate

Not all animals have red blood, even there are some that don’t have blood at all, that’s the case of some insects (invertebrates) that have a liquid called hemolymph and are sometimes colorless.

Many species do not need to have a crown to believe that they have blue blood, or of a different color than individuals of the same race.

There are simply other colors of blood, varying for different reasons: red blood is due to something called hemoglobin that according to Acercaciencia, ” is a protein that has iron atoms associated which are reversibly joined to oxygen. This iron, when associated with oxygen, oxidizes quickly acquiring the characteristic red color”.

So, without further ado, let’s talk about the 5 animals that don’t have red blood.

 

5. Atlantic Horseshoe Crab

via National Wildlife Federation

Also known as (Limulus polyphemus), the Atlantic horseshoe crab is in danger of extinction for several reasons, but specifically by the hunting of this type of crab for its striking blood. It’s due to hemocyanin, which pigments blood to the color blue.

 

4. Skinks Of New Guinea 

via Paga Hills Estate

The skinks of New Guinea are a kind of lizard, that measures between 4.5 to 13.7 inches, and the color of their blood is a greenish tone by the pigment-related to “biliverdines” which is generated in the cells of the reticuloendothelial system.

 

3. Brachiopoda

via Earth Life

The Brachiopoda are animals that live at the bottom of the sea, called bilvan animals. There are different species of these beings, and some have yellowish blood due to the protein vanabin. You’re not likely to see Brachiopodas of the same kind pretty often.

 

2. Octopus

via Scientific American

Octopuses are some of the most fascinating animals in the world. They have 3 hearts, 8 tentacles, lack a skeleton, and as it happens with the other animals in this list, it also lacks hemoglobin. Instead, the octopus has hemocyanin, making the pigment blue.


1. Icefish

via The New York Times

This species of fish lives in Antarctica. Icefish lack hemoglobin and any kind of pigmentation in their blood. Believe it or not, their blood is actually white due to the oxygen that flows through their bodies. It’s perfectly fitting for something that swims underneath frozen water.